Market value of biotech starups

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Market value of biotech starups

Postby wolfhnd on February 8th, 2016, 10:33 pm 

There are a lot of start up biotech companies out there. Anyone investing in them?
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Re: What are the odds of getting rich on biotech

Postby zetreque on February 9th, 2016, 2:33 am 

I donno about biotech but a good friend of mine stumbled onto a pinksheet he is excited about on friday in media marketing and he doesn't get excited that often about those.

and if you ask me. NEVER trade in the stock market. I have gotten to know it intimately and it's one of the worst systems on the planet. You are better off putting your money in a shoe box, or spread it out among several banks and various investments to be diversified. The friend I speak of worked on the floor of one of the stock exchanges. I want the whole stock market system to go away. We need to transition into a better economic system.

Go watch the wolf of wallstreet and if you still want to give your money to them, good luck.
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Re: What are the odds of getting rich on biotech

Postby wolfhnd on February 9th, 2016, 5:46 am 

I agree that the stock market is almost a joke as instituted but it servers some useful purposes. I was very disappointed that the OWS movement turned out to be just a bunch of malcontents claiming victimhood. Whatever rational reform they were advocating got lost in the shouting and crying.
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Re: What are the odds of getting rich on biotech

Postby zetreque on February 9th, 2016, 6:01 am 

I think those movements are great, but it seems to me that many protests and activism is a bunch of people that don't really even know what they are fighting for. It's like rallying a bunch of blind followers to the other extreme. Pretty sad how little thought people put into anything they do.

When it comes to the stock market. it's a whole lot of blind followers ruled by greed.
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Re: What are the odds of getting rich on biotech

Postby Braininvat on February 9th, 2016, 11:11 am 

Biotech, like IT startups in the 80s, are pretty volatile. Don't place bets unless it's "fun money" you're prepared to lose. Management problems are often invisible from the outside, until there's a meltdown.

sincerely,

Ben Burned
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Re: What are the odds of getting rich on biotech

Postby BioWizard on February 9th, 2016, 2:42 pm 

As someone who is interested in putting together a biotech startup, I'll have to say that it would require a lot of in-depth research and analysis on my part before I can rationally decide to invest in a specific biotech startup (assuming rationality is worth anything there). It also depends a lot on your investment strategy. If you invest in a certain way, volatility might work for you. If you're a very long term investor and diversify your portfolio enough, you may not care. The fact remains, though, that a lot of VC is still heading over to biotech.

So is it a bubble? Hard to say. I think people are becoming more savvy now about the relationship (and distinction) between discovery and and having an actual product. A decade ago, people thought sequencing of the human genome itself was going to instantly revolutionize everything. Now we know that is far from real. If you're pitching an idea for a product or a therapeutic, chances are you're not going to get funded anymore. People now want to see a lot more data, a solid R&D plan, AND a solid commercialization strategy. In other words, VCs still have a huge appetite for biotech, but they are becoming more weary, and they want to fund potentially promising businesses, not ideas (which could be a good thing).

By the way, I don't understand why people equate information technology with biotechnology (and call the 2000 bubble the first biotech bubble)? The two are not the same industry.
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Re: What are the odds of getting rich on biotech

Postby wolfhnd on February 9th, 2016, 4:23 pm 

Are there ethical concerns about patenting biological processes?

One of the problems with drug companies today is that they can't afford to develop drugs for some diseases that our important to societies, do the biotech industry startup play into this problem one way or the other?

In relation to question two does a biotech revolution represent a move away from the free exchange of information between scientist?
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Re: What are the odds of getting rich on biotech

Postby BioWizard on February 10th, 2016, 1:54 pm 

wolfhnd » 09 Feb 2016 03:23 pm wrote:Are there ethical concerns about patenting biological processes?


Not an easy topic, no simple answer.

I would draw a distinction between native biological processes and engineered biological processes. For example, patenting a gene or a pathway makes no sense to me. On the other hand, patenting an engineered biological system that wouldn't otherwise exist (e.g. CAR-T cells), or an assembly of biological components designed to carry out a function in a context they wouldn't otherwise have (e.g. using CRISPR/CAS9 to do genome edits), does. Engineered biology is inventive, in every sense of the word.

In other words, patenting inventions - OK, patenting discoveries - probably not.

One of the problems with drug companies today is that they can't afford to develop drugs for some diseases that our important to societies, do the biotech industry startup play into this problem one way or the other?


I don't think biotech startups are uniquely shielded from such R&D and/or market risks. In fact, most biotech startups count on selling off to bigger companies that have the necessary resources to take the product to market.

In relation to question two does a biotech revolution represent a move away from the free exchange of information between scientist?


I don't think so. More biotech startups might mean that more inventions get intellectual protection, but that information is ultimately made available through patent publication. So whether you're publishing in a scientific journal or USPTO's website, I feel that the motives to readily share or temporarily conceal your inventions are largely similar (i.e. ensuring priority).
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