Cross Protection

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Cross Protection

Postby zetreque on September 10th, 2017, 3:32 am 

What is a cross protection study in laymen terms?
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Re: Cross Protection

Postby Braininvat on September 10th, 2017, 10:13 am 

Basically, it is a laboratory setup where vampires are brought in, exposed to crucifixes, and then try a range of defensive strategies to ward off injury.

Seriously, I thought it was trying different forms of a vaccine on a subject. I.e. injecting different segments of a virus and seeing which chunks best develop antibodies in the host.
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Re: Cross Protection

Postby doogles on September 10th, 2017, 5:25 pm 

zetreque » Sun Sep 10, 2017 3:32 am wrote:What is a cross protection study in laymen terms?


I'm not sure if there have been any other meanings of the term in science but it has been in common use with regard to vaccinations.

The first and most well-known example was the use of cowpox to cross-protect against smallpox in humans. It was based on the observation that milkmaids (ladies who milked dairy cows by hand) seemed to be immune from smallpox. They were regarded as having unblemished skin. Cowpox appeared only as scabby lesions on the teats of cows and if anyone milking them had small lacerations on their hands, they would develop small lesions similar to cowpox on their hands. It became obvious to people that anyone who hand-milked cows was less prone to contract smallpox, and that those who contracted a small dose of cow pox on the hands became cross-protected against the severe human disease of smallpox.

Of interest, micro-organisms had not been recognised as a cause of disease up to that time and no one had any inkling that there was such a thing as a virus.

By the time I became a veterinary practitioner, this cross species protection by a virus causing a disease in one animal against a disease in another was becoming established. For example, it was discovered that the viruses of rinderpest in cattle (a severe gastroenteritis), measles in humans and distemper in dogs (a severe virus infection of the immune system with associated secondary infections) were all antigenically related.

I've lost touch with developments over the last 35 years or so, but an attenuated strain of human measles virus was used as the main vaccine against distemper in veterinary practice the last time I was in touch.

I have a vague recall that there were some developments in cross protections between the antigens in some bacteria and virus diseases as well

This field of study may have grown since I last wielded a syringe, but fwiw, the above summarises my understanding of the term cross protection.
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Re: Cross Protection

Postby zetreque on September 10th, 2017, 10:21 pm 

Thanks doogles. So it has to do with multiple species. The field I'm coming across it in is forest ecology where plants host diseases that carry on to other plants.
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