The rise of patrilineal clans in early farming civs

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The rise of patrilineal clans in early farming civs

Postby hyksos on June 1st, 2018, 3:28 pm 

Early agricultural societies underwent a sudden transition into warring clans centered around male lineages. This sudden shift occurred around 5000 BC.

The evidence? It is in the Y-chromosome of the men alive today.




Wars and clan structure may explain a strange biological event 7,000 years ago, Stanford researchers find
Stanford News Service

https://news.stanford.edu/press-releases/2018/05/30/war-clan-structubiological-event/
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Re: The rise of patrilineal clans in early farming civs

Postby Braininvat on June 1st, 2018, 4:57 pm 

First thought flashing through my head when I saw this was hey another bottleneck. That's also a good demonstration of the quality of work undergraduates can produce. Cool.
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Re: The rise of patrilineal clans in early farming civs

Postby wolfhnd on June 1st, 2018, 9:41 pm 

Interesting article.

Societies evolve and the answer to the problem of male sexual access and rivalry was at least partially resolved in Western Civilization by Monogamy. To some extent that progress has been eroded by the sexual revolution where 20 percent of men have sex with 70 percent of women. It is a reflection on the pareto principle. It seems likely that in addition to warfare agriculture disrupted the egalitarian traditions associated with hunter gathers as resources became increasingly unequally distributed. Unequal distribution of resources influence mating preferences even today.

Additionally the pareto distribution of resources increases male aggression. Pareto distribution patterns makes warfare more attractive to young males unable to compete by other means in the sexual market place. We can see that today in the disconnect between poverty and violence in comparative cultural analysis.

Agriculture made civilization and organized warfare possible but it would be hard to prove that the overall level of violence changed. It is also worth noting that incompetence carries a higher price as social complexity increases favoring different patterns of sexual selection.
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Re: The rise of patrilineal clans in early farming civs

Postby BadgerJelly on June 11th, 2018, 1:26 am 

Seems like an obvious explanation.

Confined resources, competition and conflict over resources. Men are better in a brawl than women.

There could be other more weird reasons playing into this though. A more far flung idea would be the knock-off effect of diet wiping out part of the male population due to some intricate mechanism of genetics.

Don’t forget that a number of subtle incremental alterations can build to create one sudden genetic shift. It may even have been about a certain stage in cultural development where those less adapted to larger groups simply fell by the wayside - this wouldn’t fully account for the other sex though.
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Re: The rise of patrilineal clans in early farming civs

Postby wolfhnd on June 11th, 2018, 1:51 pm 

The connection to agriculture is misleading because the same pattern of reduced number of males represented in the gene pool can be found in nomadic people. Any hierarchical social structure is likely to produce the same pattern accept in societies that enforce monogamy.
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Re: The rise of patrilineal clans in early farming civs

Postby BadgerJelly on June 12th, 2018, 10:49 am 

wolfhnd » June 12th, 2018, 1:51 am wrote:The connection to agriculture is misleading because the same pattern of reduced number of males represented in the gene pool can be found in nomadic people. Any hierarchical social structure is likely to produce the same pattern accept in societies that enforce monogamy.


I guess it is quite possible that some shift in environmental conditions could’ve forced people into a more nomadic lifestyle for a period of time leading to the sudden dip on diversity?

Difficult to theory craft these things, but it’s always nice to hear about some new ideas.
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