Do single-family homes really make the best neighborhoods?

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Do single-family homes really make the best neighborhoods?

Postby TheVat on November 1st, 2020, 12:09 pm 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/ ... story.html

Interesting intersection of social science, urban planning, and political beliefs.
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Re: Taking Stock of Hancock

Postby Faradave on November 1st, 2020, 1:10 pm 

Though I grew up in the woods, loving nature, I'd be happy to spare that nature to live in a can like the John Hancock Tower in Chicago. Like many of these behemoths, it's a city within a city affording many efficiencies to its inhabitants. Residents never have to leave, though with the lake shore just steps away, who can resist.

Some people see it as a monstrosity, like the Death Star with twin satanic horns, but for me... fascination. I could stare at it for hours. It's long been a personal goal of mine to one day fly a solid state lift vehicle of my own invention from the rooftop. I can't be sure that'll happen but the inspiration feels real and the work mostly keeps me out of trouble.
John Hancock Tower small.jpg
I aim to land on the beach (gently, if possible).

John Hancock Tower x-bracing.jpg
The X-bracing positively screams "structural stability".
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Re: Do single-family homes really make the best neighborhood

Postby Serpent on November 1st, 2020, 1:57 pm 

I've seen a bunch of climate change disaster movies and a real live LA earthquake -- I see no point in living higher than we can climb up to and down from on our own steam. Ideally, a liveable neighbourhood is diverse, low rise, and within walking distance of work places, recreation facilities and food sources.
I saw a PBS documentary once about designed communities; all the workable ones were predicated on that same principle. https://www.pbs.org/video/10-changed-america-10-towns-cha The same idea is being applied to urban renewal projects around the world. https://www.tvo.org/programs/the-life-sized-city

The suburban sprawl was an uncompleted idea. It never came close to fulfilling the dream. People who live there may be afraid of losing the value of real estate into which they've sunk their fortunes, but they do not seem as happy, animated or engaged as people who live in organic neighbourhoods. Nowadays, too, even the women don't stay at home and form their own closed community: everybody drives off or is carried off to the city, adding more pollution to lost leisure time and gained stress, leaving those oversized, overpriced houses unused most of the time. Meanwhile, you know what happens to people in concentrated urban subsidized housing.
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Re: Getting the Shaft

Postby Faradave on November 1st, 2020, 4:53 pm 

Serpent wrote:I see no point in living higher than we can climb up to and down from on our own steam.
I have to concede that elevator shafts waste a large amount of valuable floor space, are inefficient at one car per shaft and height limited in that steel cables snap under their own weight (regardless of thickness) over about 1,600 feet.

Nevertheless, new electromagnetic (or my orthosonic lift) systems permit many cabs per shaft, traveling one-way, in a loop. They're much more efficient and by adhering to walls can even be designed to travel diagonally or on curves.

I like small designed communities too.
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Re: Do single-family homes really make the best neighborhood

Postby Serpent on November 1st, 2020, 5:19 pm 

That's not my concern with elevators. In earthquake, tsunamis and airplane attacks, the upper floors of tall buildings collapse on the lower ones, each successive floor crushing more of the building below, and everyone in it. In a fire, the elevators shut down and people trying to escape are caught in the stairwells or halls. There was a fire in one unit of the downtown Toronto apartment block where my SO once lived (subway station, parking, restaurants, fitness center and shopping mall, all in one building - very convenient) and five people died, trying to get to the roof.
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