the data is in : the Big Bang happened.

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the data is in : the Big Bang happened.

Postby hyksos on September 10th, 2017, 8:50 am 

The data is in.
The Big Bang is real.
The Big Bang happened.

Multiple different kinds measurements of data from stars, globular clusters, Cepheid variables, supernovae, et cetera are in. While each measurement gives a different estimation for the age of the universe, all estimates cluster around 12 to 16 billion years. And wouldnt-ya-know-it , 13.8 fits exactly in that range.

Coincidence? I think not.

For any weary internet traveler who happens upon this forum, you may still be holding out on the Big Bang. Maybe you are familiar with the various counter-arguments against it. That's okay. You are among like-minded company. I collected such a list here myself : viewtopic.php?f=72&t=33343

Our mutual foray into extreme doubt and rebellion against academia must come to an end. The vast collection of data from telescopes all agree that there is a "cut off point" for which no older objects are found in the sky. If you are still in doubt about the Big Bang, perform the following recipe :

1. Read this viewtopic.php?f=72&t=33431
2. Look at this :

whitedwarfdata.png


3. then read this : http://w.astro.berkeley.edu/~dperley/univage/univage.html

If you need to go home and cry and get it "out of your system" , the time to do that is now.

When you are done overcoming the emotional hurdle, come back to the forum and join us. Join us in a universe that had a beginning; that has an age; a universe were the Big Bang is real.
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Re: the data is in : the Big Bang happened.

Postby hyksos on September 10th, 2017, 1:38 pm 

I am using 'Big Bang' euphemistically here. In more literal , legalistic terms, I mean "big bang" to signify an age of the universe in our local region of space.

(In any case!) Steady-state theories are altogether falsified by the evidence presented above.
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Re: the data is in : the Big Bang happened.

Postby Infinite_Observer on September 11th, 2017, 1:10 am 

I used to ride the bus to work and Jahovah's witnesses would frequently come to try to convert the homeless people who spent most of their time there. I often times engaged in very respectful debate with them and they were very nice even though I would often try to debunk their beliefs. One belief in particular was something along the lines of the universe only being about 5000 years old (not sure if that is the exact nimber but should be roughly accurate.). I suppose this proves my side of the argument!
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Re: the data is in : the Big Bang happened.

Postby BurtJordaan on September 11th, 2017, 12:11 pm 

hyksos » 10 Sep 2017, 14:50 wrote:Multiple different kinds measurements of data from stars, globular clusters, Cepheid variables, supernovae, et cetera are in.

I think the most important 'et cetera' is the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), as observed by the WMAP and Planck missions. Taken all together, they confirmed the viability of the model that starts with inflation, followed by the LCDM solution of the general relativity equations.

None of the mentioned observations measured the 'age of the universe' directly, but rather gave us values for all the parameters of the LCDM model. These are used to calculate the non-linear shape of the expansion curve, which is then extrapolated back to find out how long ago the expansion must have started.
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Re: the data is in : the Big Bang happened.

Postby hyksos on September 16th, 2017, 8:04 am 

In very rough-hewn terms, cosmology is broken into two separate disciplines. 1.) Theoretical cosmology 2.) Physical cosmology.

"theoretical" involves a lot of mathematics and is performed on chalkboards. The mathematics deals with energy density of the universe, general relativity, inflation, and so on.

"physical" is about red shift, stars, and large expensive telescopes.

In the post above, BurtJordaan is making references to theoretical cosmology. Physics applies to the universe as a whole, and so the chalkboard theory will give some prediction of the age of the universe. The data (from physical cosmology) is indeed in harmonious agreement with the predicted value.
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Re: the data is in : the Big Bang happened.

Postby hyksos on September 16th, 2017, 8:08 am 

more data is in! --> http://www.sciencechatforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=72&t=33510


Speaking personally, white dwarf experiments from Messier 4 was the straw that broke my steady-state camel's back. But there is other data supporting the big bang, each with differing levels of convincing-ness, as a matter of taste.
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Re: the data is in : the Big Bang happened.

Postby curiosity on July 17th, 2019, 7:23 am 

Yes...
The event happened !!! The big question is... "how do we describe what occurred?
We can only say with any certainty that an instance of space-time emerged!

Some of the bigger questions are... A, emerged into what ? B, Came from where? C, What caused the event?
If we stick with the stock answers to these questions, there is absolutely no hope whatsoever of ever solving the mystery.
If we accept that the instance of space-time within which we exist, is the only instance of space-time to exist, then all hope of gaining an understanding of reality is lost.
Alternatively, if we can open our minds to the possibility that there are other instances of space-time existing within a greater reality. the singular event which spawned our instance of space-time could possibly be no more than the effect of an event that occurred in one of those other instances of space-time.

Science has consistently overestimated the importance of our planet and its location within the grand scheme of things. We now know that even our galaxy, which was at one time believed to be the entire universe is just an unremarkable galaxy, among-st a myriad of other galaxies. So, why should the instance of space-time, within which our universe exists be so special? "I don't believe it is!" I believe it to be just one of many such instances which make up a much grander reality.

The solutions to many of the unanswered questions in physics demand a much better understanding of space-time...
I believe the answers will eventually come, but it will require some out of the box thinking. future generations will look back on the current crop of physicists and wonder why they took so long to gain an understanding.
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