Education differences between political parties

This is a forum for discussing philosophical theories of government and social structure. It is not a venue for partisan rants or plugging favored candidates.

Education differences between political parties

Postby zetreque on November 8th, 2018, 1:29 pm 

I was trying to find some information about the diversity of degree types held by politicians in each political party. My hypothesis was that republicans far more often contain buisness related degrees while democrats contain much more diverse topics of degrees.

I came across this article.
I don't agree with all of the ideas in this article but it has some interesting ones.
https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2018/11/education-gap-explains-american-politics/575113/
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3722
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: Education differences between political parties

Postby zetreque on November 8th, 2018, 1:53 pm 

If I had the time, I think it would be interesting to look up every member of the House and or Senate that was elected over the past several elections, then look up what type of college degree they have. See what the results show.
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3722
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: Education differences between political parties

Postby Braininvat on November 8th, 2018, 1:54 pm 

The more you learn, and are knowledge oriented, the more probably it may be that you will think about how other people live and their cultural context. It may also help you analyze ideologies and economic theories that are driving politics. In any political discussion, I find myself not so much concerned about what party someone declares, but how motivated they are to expand their knowledge and engage with relevant facts. My experience is that less educated persons tend to be more in a "team" mindset, i.e. they just want to wave a big foam finger for their "team" and score points. I believe they do this because it's easier, if you don't have much knowledge or motivation to think about issues, to just defer to an authority figure who you believe does. This is why Jefferson in helping set up the structure of our democracy, always stressed the importance of learning for every citizen. He didn't want an America that was enraptured in cults of personality that blindly followed leaders.
User avatar
Braininvat
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 6860
Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Black Hills


Re: Education differences between political parties

Postby zetreque on November 8th, 2018, 2:06 pm 

That's one of the things missing from that article.

I hate to bring this off topic now but another of the things I think is flawed in that article is the immigration issue. It's not all about being racist. I think what very few if anyone realizes is that it's actually a population growth issue. It's just an easy excuse to blame it on immigrants or people with different skin color and culture. Too many people of the same skin color and culture have growing conflicts too when population increases. Increases in population naturally lead to resource competition, job competition, and pollution to the commons.
No one gets it, but IMO population growth is one of the primary underlying problems in the world for most things. Political polarity is one of those things.
User avatar
zetreque
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 3722
Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Paradise being lost to humanity
Blog: View Blog (3)


Re: Education differences between political parties

Postby wolfhnd on November 8th, 2018, 3:50 pm 

zetreque » Thu Nov 08, 2018 6:06 pm wrote:That's one of the things missing from that article.

I hate to bring this off topic now but another of the things I think is flawed in that article is the immigration issue. It's not all about being racist. I think what very few if anyone realizes is that it's actually a population growth issue. It's just an easy excuse to blame it on immigrants or people with different skin color and culture. Too many people of the same skin color and culture have growing conflicts too when population increases. Increases in population naturally lead to resource competition, job competition, and pollution to the commons.
No one gets it, but IMO population growth is one of the primary underlying problems in the world for most things. Political polarity is one of those things.


Population growth is relevant to other factors. Certainly population density is not a problem in Europe but may be in the third world. Industrial agriculture has reduced the number of acres needed to feed a given population and excess man power doesn't lead to abject poverty.

Back to the original post.

Political affiliation is like religion, most people are born into it. Like religion you are probably less likely to continue in your parents footsteps depending on how relatively better educated you are to them. That is of course a gross generalization and probably applies more to the previous generation.

The relationship between class and education is perhaps more explanatory than other factors. Conservative values are probably more useful to the lower class who do not have the intellectual or financial resources to navigate around the pitfalls of drugs, promiscuity, lack of community, and consumerism (materialism) that their better educated counter parts do. Belief is more important than reason if the major issue you face is despondency or social alienation and you would have trouble rationalizing your own moral code. Proposition 8 in California may be an example which shows a disconnect between party affiliation and actual beliefs.

At the lower economic scale it is probably also true that most change you have experienced has been negative. Again taking California as an example high costs for energy, food, transportation and housing disproportionately negatively effect the less educated. Those items represent a smaller percentage of expenditure for the better educated. Only massive public expenditures, tradition and culture maintain political affiliation. You in up with a strange mix of conservative values and liberal politics. Elsewhere economics may have a more direct effect on voting patterns because the benefits are more mixed.

In the South where poverty related to low levels of industrialization, poor educational systems, less urbanization and a stronger since of tradition held sway the switch from blue to red was pretty predictable. Low levels of state revenues made government subsidies less practical and the advantage of higher education less clear. Less education in turn makes conservative values more attractive because again change is less likely to be positive at least less obviously so. As I pointed out earlier the less intelligent you are the less likely you are to be able to take advantage of change, adapt to or cope with change. Change disrupts the one thing the poor had always been able to count on which is community for the more affluent community is far less important.
User avatar
wolfhnd
Resident Member
 
Posts: 4737
Joined: 21 Jun 2005
Blog: View Blog (3)



Return to Political Theory

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests