Edging Closer to Hard Evidence for DMT in human Brain?

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Edging Closer to Hard Evidence for DMT in human Brain?

Postby BadgerJelly on June 27th, 2019, 11:05 am 

Had to drop by to drop this off!

Could be the first step toward what is likely to be one of the most important scientific discoveries of the 21st centuries ... IF hard evidence is found.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-45812-w

These results show for the first time that the rat brain is capable of synthesizing and releasing DMT at concentrations comparable to known monoamine neurotransmitters and raise the possibility that this phenomenon may occur similarly in human brains.
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Re: Edging Closer to Hard Evidence for DMT in human Brain?

Postby doogles on June 27th, 2019, 6:18 pm 

BadgerJelly, I'm curious to know why you think that new piece of research "Could be the first step toward what is likely to be one of the most important scientific discoveries of the 21st centuries ... IF hard evidence is found."

Have I missed something?

Knowledge about the physiological roles of tryptamines has been accumulating for decades.

You may be interested in this review titled Biomedical Significance of Tryptamine: A Review by Kousaraet al (2017; https://www.longdom.org/open-access/bio ... 000239.pdf).

The authors have cited references going back decades to its multiple roles in human beings and other animals. Here's one small excerpt on its roles as a neurotransmitter -- "The studies shows that enzymatic decarboxylation of amino acids leads to alkaloids such as L-ADDC enzyme found in serum of various animals and humans is an effective catalyst for tryptamine production as well as pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) distributed in mammalian tissues responsible for the production of serotinine and melatonin [21]. The regional distribution in both striatum and hypothalamus of 5hydroxytryptamine a well-known neurotransmitter helps in regulation of alcoholism in humans as well as mood, sleep and anxiety in mammals [22]. The renowned 5-HT biogenic amine as neurotransmitter to regulate human CNS such as mood-anxiety, aggressiveness, impulsivity, cognition, feeding behaviours and body temperature also contribute in modulation of peripheral activities such as in the gut function, the immune and inflammatory responses, blood stem cells differentiation and hemodynamic functions [23]. The alteration of 5-HT transmission has resulted in autism and cognitive deficit, mood-affective disorders [24], obesity and other syndromes with peripheral symptoms such as chronic fatigue syndrome and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) etc. [25]. The scavenging properties of circadian regulators, N-acetyl-5-HT (NAS) and melatonin (MLT) is due to indoleamines in 5-HT moiety and through “kynurenine shunt” a number of molecules produce in vertebrates and humans, are involved in inflammation, excitatory neurotransmission, immune response and many other functions [26]."

This 2017 review has over 60 references.
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Re: Edging Closer to Hard Evidence for DMT in human Brain?

Postby BadgerJelly on July 8th, 2019, 11:41 pm 

doogles -

Because altered states of consciousness allow for insights that cannot be found so readily in the mundane world and if these biochemical mechanisms are confirmed then I imagine we’ll begin to see the conditions under which these chemicals are produced in the human brain and how they relate to learning, survival and exploration.

We already know that these states can be induced by certain techniques, but it would be a breakthrough to know how these triggers relate to the biochemistry - maybe I am expecting too much and it may simply open up more questions than answers.

I hope to see this my lifetime. Given the easing of access to psychedelics for researchers I cannot imagine that there are not already several up and coming neuroscientists looking into this and what potential may result from it.

It is quite possible the experience I had had nothing to do with DMT. From reports on the experience given by others under laboratory conditions there are some reasonably strong similarities. This in combination with a number of well known triggers for inducing ASC’s (I unwittingly fulfilled) leads me to believe that the kind of discovery I am talking about will quite literally change the current face of human society.

It may take time to bleed throughout human society, but such a study would have the most historic significance of this century.

Nothing ‘woo woo’ in mind here. I’m talking about a shift in approaches to education and all social offer social interactions - exchange of knowledge, scientific investigation and general collaboration and freedom on a level never seen before.

As with most discoveries I’m sure they’ll be attempt to misuse this, but ‘using’ it will only promote the benefits not add to any attempts of maltreatment.

Note: I’m talking about a paradigm shift akin to the farming revolution only this will be more obviously on a ‘mental plane’ and our cultivation of ‘mind’ will explode just like farming did. I don’t mind if you think I’m a lunatic btw :)
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Re: Edging Closer to Hard Evidence for DMT in human Brain?

Postby doogles on July 10th, 2019, 6:03 pm 

BadgerJelly, I'm still not clear why you regard this extra small piece of knowledge about tryptamines as possibly one of the greatest scientific discoveries of the 21st century.

You apparently believe that altered states of consciousness (ASC) can lead to creative discoveries and this of course has been the case with natural ASC's in many 'normal' chemically-unassisted cases of mental imagery such as daydreaming. Einstein, Faraday, Tesla and Wilson and Crick have cited natural mental imagery as having a role into their insights.

Can you cite a single case of a chemically-induced ASC as being associated with a ground-breaking discovery of any kind? LSD and other mind-altering drugs have been around for decades now.
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Re: Edging Closer to Hard Evidence for DMT in human Brain?

Postby BadgerJelly on July 10th, 2019, 7:03 pm 

doogles » July 11th, 2019, 6:03 am wrote:BadgerJelly, I'm still not clear why you regard this extra small piece of knowledge about tryptamines as possibly one of the greatest scientific discoveries of the 21st century.

You apparently believe that altered states of consciousness (ASC) can lead to creative discoveries and this of course has been the case with natural ASC's in many 'normal' chemically-unassisted cases of mental imagery such as daydreaming. Einstein, Faraday, Tesla and Wilson and Crick have cited natural mental imagery as having a role into their insights.

Can you cite a single case of a chemically-induced ASC as being associated with a ground-breaking discovery of any kind? LSD and other mind-altering drugs have been around for decades now.


Not this one. It’s not direct hard evidence. It’s not LSD nor is it a ‘drug’.

For starters knowing more about the neuroendocrinology - if this is what I think it is - will lead to new fields of investigation including treatment for ‘mental’ wellbeing including criminality, personality change, opening up creativity, consciousness, post traumatic stress, and addiction. The implication for learning and health would be in the form of certain phases of human life.

I’m guessing. All I know is this is, in my case (IF it is DMT), something that can change the face of human society, but I’ve no idea how it will change. If my experience was nothing to do with DMT then ... well, I’m wrong.

Basically I’m talking about a kind of universal ‘religion’ - but it isn’t a ‘religion’, rather something that uses the best parts of the practically dead religious traditions (buddhist mediation being one aspect that has a great effect on society). What I’m talking about is MUCH stronger than mere ‘meditaton’.

That’s the best, most open and most honest reply you’re going to get from me :)
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