Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

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Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby BadgerJelly on April 9th, 2021, 10:37 am 

Best I can find to date:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjnK5exNhZ0

A new ‘force’?
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Re: Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby Serpent on April 9th, 2021, 3:00 pm 

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Re: Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby doogles on April 9th, 2021, 5:07 pm 

The thing about Badger's video that caught my attention was the part where they spoke about particles coming into and out of existence in a vacuum.

I've had a gut feeling for some time that we may be overlooking a huge field of investigation in the 'space' itself. There was a thread some years in which I was able to touch on the subject with some footage from a South Australian scientist who had produced evidence of this. Unfortunately, it would take me days to relocate that thread on this site, or to find it on my own computer. I'm hoping that someone more familiar with the subject can relocate it.

I'm also hoping that the name based on the greek letter 'mu', does not get confused with the use of of the prefix 'mu' for micro- in other sciences.
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Re: Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby doogles on April 15th, 2021, 4:41 pm 

In my last post, I asked if anyone could remember the video produced by Professor Derek Leinweber about matter fleetingly appearing and disappearing in the ‘empty space’ that represents almost the total volume of the entire universe. I found it again on this website -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3xLuZNKhlY. It was interesting to hear that it would take enormous amounts of energy to maintain a truly empty space and that if you could attain such a state, it would be unstable.

There is a profile of that scientist on this site -- Professor Derek Leinweber | Researcher Profiles (adelaide.edu.au).

Having just heard about muons in this thread by Badger, and in the thread by Hyksos, as well as hearing about tauons from Faradave, I found the following summary of the work of Leinweber’s group. It contains yet more terms that are foreign to me. Can anyone explain them? QCD by the way stands for Quantum Chromodynamics.

“The Lattice QCD Group in the ARC Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM) has made many significant contributions to the field and the following list provides a few of the highlights. In particular, we:
• Discovered the existence of meson-baryon bound states in QCD, resolving 50 years speculation. By calculating the quark-sector contributions to the magnetic moment of the Lambda(1405) baryon, an exotic molecular kaon-nucleon bound state was discovered.
• Resolved the structure of the Roper resonance of the nucleon. In an unanticipated discovery, the Roper resonance is not dominated by a quark-model state, rendering decades of quark-model phenomenology obsolete. Instead the Roper is a resonance generated by strong rescattering in multiple meson-baryon scattering channels. It presents a wonderful challenge in determining its electromagnetic structure.
• Established the fundamental role of centre vortices in the gluon field of the nontrivial QCD vacuum in underpinning both the confinement of quarks and the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry. It is the most fundamental mechanism responsible for dynamical mass generation in hadronic matter.
• Extended the graded-symmetry formalism of Partially Quenched Chiral Perturbation theory to the flavour-singlet sector of baryons.
• Created a novel formalism based on partially-quenched chiral effective field theory and lattice QCD simulations for determining strange-quark contributions to baryon magnetic moments and polarizabilities.
• Resolved the momentum dependence of the nonperturbative quark and gluon propagators via lattice QCD simulations.
• Created the lattice-QCD based visualizations and animations of QCD vacuum structure featured in the 2004 Nobel Prize Acceptance Lecture of Prof. Frank Wilczek, scientific annual reports, posters, popular international science magazines and in YouTube science-video blogs.”
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Re: Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby JohnD on April 27th, 2021, 4:01 am 

Muons were discovered by Carl D. Anderson and Seth Neddermeyer at Caltech in 1936, while studying cosmic radiation. Anderson noticed particles that curved differently from electrons and other known particles when passed through a magnetic field. They were negatively charged but curved less sharply than electrons, but more sharply than protons, for particles of the same velocity. It was assumed that the magnitude of their negative electric charge was equal to that of the electron, and so to account for the difference in curvature, it was supposed that their mass was greater than an electron but smaller than a proton. Thus Anderson initially called the new particle a mesotron, adopting the prefix meso- from the Greek word for "mid-". The existence of the muon was confirmed in 1937 by J.C. Street and E.C. Stevenson's cloud chamber experiment.
predicted before the discovery of any mesons, by theorist Hideki Yukawa
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Re: Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby TheVat on April 27th, 2021, 10:37 am 

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01033-8


Take supersymmetry, or SUSY, a theory that many physicists once thought was the most promising for extending the current paradigm, the standard model of particle physics. Supersymmetry comes in many variants, but in general, it posits that every particle in the standard model has a yet-to-be-discovered heavier counterpart, called a superpartner. Superpartners could be among the ‘virtual particles’ that constantly pop in and out of the empty space surrounding the muon, a quantum effect that would help to explain why this particle’s magnetic field is stronger than expected.

If so, these particles could solve two mysteries at once: muon magnetism and dark matter, the unseen stuff that, through its gravitational pull, seems to keep galaxies from flying apart.

Until ten years ago, various lines of evidence had suggested that a superpartner weighing as much as a few hundred protons could constitute dark matter. Many expected that the collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) outside Geneva, Switzerland, would produce a plethora of these new particles, but so far none has materialized. The data that the LHC has produced so far suggest that typical superpartners, if they exist, cannot weigh less than 1,000 protons (the bounds can be higher depending on the type of superparticle and the flavour of supersymmetry theory).

“Many people would say supersymmetry is almost dead,” says Dominik Stöckinger, a theoretical physicist at the Dresden University of Technology in Germany, who is a member of the Muon g – 2 collaboration. But he still sees it as a plausible way to explain his experiment’s findings. “If you look at it in comparison to any other ideas, it’s not worse than the others,” he says.

There is one way in which Muon g – 2 could resurrect supersymmetry and also provide evidence for dark matter, Stöckinger says. There could be not one superpartner, but two appearing in LHC collisions, both of roughly similar masses — say, around 550 and 500 protons. Collisions would create the more massive one, which would then rapidly decay into two particles: the lighter superpartner plus a run-of-the-mill, standard-model particle carrying away the 50 protons’ worth of mass difference.


(....)


The LHCb muon anomalies suffer from the same problem as the new muon-magnetism finding: various possible explanations exist, but they are all “ad hoc”, says physicist Adam Falkowski, at the University of Paris-Saclay. “I’m quite appalled by this procession of zombie SUSY models dragged out of their graves,” says Falkowski.
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Re: Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby doogles on April 27th, 2021, 4:49 pm 

Thanks for the feedback JohnD and TheVat.

How is it that muons were theoretically discovered in 1937, and I did physics at high school in the 1940s, and at Year 1 of University in 1949, and am just hearing about them 70 years later?

And I'm pleased to read that "Superpartners could be among the ‘virtual particles’ that constantly pop in and out of the empty space surrounding the muon, ... ". It seems that 'empty space" may be getting some attention in the scheme of things.
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Re: Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby bangstrom on May 6th, 2021, 6:34 am 

doogles » April 15th, 2021, 3:41 pm wrote:In my last post, I asked if anyone could remember the video produced by Professor Derek Leinweber about matter fleetingly appearing and disappearing in the ‘empty space’ that represents almost the total volume of the entire universe. I found it again on this website -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3xLuZNKhlY. It was interesting to hear that it would take enormous amounts of energy to maintain a truly empty space and that if you could attain such a state, it would be unstable.

There is a profile of that scientist on this site -- Professor Derek Leinweber | Researcher Profiles (adelaide.edu.au).


Here is more from professor Leinweber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ztc6QPNUqls
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Re: Fermilab muon - new dawn for physics?

Postby doogles on May 6th, 2021, 4:59 pm 

Thank you very much for that bangstrom.

The information is still somewhat novel and puts a new concept on 'mass' as we've known it forever.

It's still a little beyond my comprehension but it opens up a whole new world of speculation eg "How does light travel through this mass of quarks and energy?"
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