Paternalism in law-making

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Re: Paternalism in law-making

Postby charon on March 4th, 2021, 5:42 pm 

I think we began to scrape the bottom of this barrel a long time ago!

Most seriously paternalistic, or rather maternalistic, laws and regulations are passed locally by councils, schools, workplaces, and so on.
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Re: Paternalism in law-making

Postby Serpent on March 4th, 2021, 7:52 pm 

Schools and workplaces don't have the power to legislate. They have very limited powers to enforce the rules they make regarding their own premises - which are in effect only so long as they're on their property.
Do you dispute their right to make such rules?
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Re: Paternalism in law-making

Postby charon on March 4th, 2021, 9:12 pm 

I didn't say they legislate as governments do - of course they don't - but they do implement local laws (byelaws) and regulations, which is what I said.

Do you dispute their right to make such rules?


Uh?
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Re: Paternalism in law-making

Postby Serpent on March 4th, 2021, 10:10 pm 

charon » March 4th, 2021, 8:12 pm wrote:I didn't say they legislate as governments do - of course they don't - but they do implement local laws (byelaws) and regulations, which is what I said.

[Do you dispute their right to make such rules?]

Uh?


Schools and workplaces cannot implement laws or bylaws. They can demand that students and staff, and in some cases, even clients, abide by rules of conduct, protocol, attire and safety - usually posted in a prominent notice near the entrance. They may also have rules concerning the use of equipment, supplies and space on their premises - usually communicated only to regular attendees.
My question was: Do you think they do not have a right to make such demands?
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Re: Paternalism in law-making

Postby charon on March 5th, 2021, 12:14 am 

Schools and workplaces cannot implement laws or bylaws.


I knew you were going to say that. I could hear it going on in my head when I was lying down.

I see I'm going to have to speak slowly...

You're perfectly right. Schools, etc, do not make byelaws. As I said in a previous post:

laws and regulations are passed locally by councils, schools, workplaces, and so on.


Laws and regulations, see? The laws part refers to the councils, the regulations part refers to the schools, etc. Councils make byelaws for the local area. Schools and other places make regulations for their staff, pupils, workforce, and so on. All clear now?

My question was: Do you think they do not have a right to make such demands?


I read it the first time. Well, if they don't have the right what the hell are they playing at!

Sorry, I'm supposed to be speaking slowly...

Yes, they do have the right to do it or, presumably, there wouldn't be any byelaws or regulations. They are not made by the national government because the whole responsibility nationwide would be far too unwieldy. Common sense, therefore, dictates they are made locally and thus the powers that be are provided with the right, by law, to implement them.

You don't honestly think we're not scraping the barrel a bit now on this subject? There'll be other threads coming along to contribute to soon enough, you know.
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Re: Paternalism in law-making

Postby Serpent on March 5th, 2021, 1:18 am 

Yes, I suppose that barrel has been scraped.
(For a minute there, I thought there might just be one or two more more pickles in the distinction between laws and regulations, between bylaws and house-rules. Guess not.)
T h a n k y o u f o r s p e a k i n g s l o w l y .
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Re: Paternalism in law-making

Postby charon on March 5th, 2021, 4:11 am 

Laws are sometimes called regulations but regulations aren't called laws.

I a m s o r r y t o s p e a k s l o w l y - a t l e a s t y o u d o n 't r u n a w a y :-)

Fun galore (but probably not paternalistic):

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-36389585
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